Bryndu Methodist Chapel

Bryndu Methodist Chapel

Site Description Bryn Du Methodist Chapel was first built in 1795 and demolished in 1859. Meanwhile a second and more elaborate chapel had been built just 20 feet away in 1814, and a third chapel built, on the site of the first, in 1859. The fourth and present chapel was built in 1901 in the Classical style of the gable-entry type and with a large arch in the facade. Bryn Du is now Grade 2 Listed as a well-detailed early twentieth century chapel with its original interior virtually intact.  

St Mary’s Church LLanfaelog

St Marys Church LLanfaelog

St Maelog's Church- A Brief History There has been a church on this site since 6th Century. The present building, a Henry Kennedy design, was built in 1848/9, around which time Kennedy designed and built many similar churches in Wales. In 2001 the church underwent extensive reordering to enable it to serve the needs of the 21st century, whilst retaining its character and best features, as illustrated in the June 2001 issue of 'Church Building' magazine. Designed by architect Adam Voelcker, the interior incorporates works of art by contemporary local artists in wood and glass, as well as a new stained glass window by art student Tiffany Tate, a previous member of the church choir.  

Capel Paran Rhosneigr

Capel Paran Rhosneigr

Site Description Paran Methodist Chapel was first built in 1828, rebuilt in 1850, modified in 1857 and again in 1867. The present chapel, dated 1850, is built in the Simple Round-Headed style of the gable-entry type.    

Rhosneigr Evangelical Church

Rhosneigr Evangelical Church

History of Horeb Chapel

At a Quarterly Meeting held at Aberffraw on 7th July, 1903, it was decided that the time was ripe to erect a Chapel at Rhosneigr. Several factors influenced their final decision. For one thing, Rhosneigr was a growing village, which already attracted visitors in large numbers, the local population was also increasing rapidly, and though there was already three Chapels in the village, they firmly believed that the Wesleyans would find faithful followers, when and if the Chapel was built.     In due course it was proved that their faith in the undertaking was justified for the flock gathered to the fold from far and wide.     To get on with this new venture a special Committee was formed which met at Rhosneigr on 21st July, 1903. No time had been wasted. They finally decided on purchasing a site from Mr. Roderick, the price of the land in those days being equivalent to 25 new pence per square yard. The original proposal was for a Chapel with a seating capacity of 250 but due to the probable heavy expense that would have to be met on a Chapel with such a provision it was finally decided on a Chapel with a seating capacity of 200.     Mr. W. Lloyd Jones of Bangor was nominated as Architect and to prepare the plans etc., and the Contractors were Messrs. Jones and Williams, Bangor. The Contract figure was £830.     Today looking at the front of the Chapel you will notice the three memorial stones built in to the main structure. These were unveiled at a special service held on 12th July, 1904. They bear the inscription "J. O. Williams, Gwylfa, Llangefni, Richard Pritchard, Cogwrn and Miss. Pritchard, Cogwrn, all faithful Wesleyans."     The unveiling took the form of a religious service conducted by the Reverend Garrett Roberts who became the first Minister of the new Chapel. Following the service there was tea for all present. The first service inside the Chapel being the actual opening ceremony took place on Sunday and Monday, 7th and 8th August, 1904 when sermons were delivered by Guest preachers, some being the leading preachers of the day. When the Chapel was first opened it had 30 members. It was given the Biblical name of "Horeb". The first Minister was the Reverend Garrett Roberts and the first deacons were Mr. William Owen, Glan y Mor, Mr. O. T. Owen, Marine Terrace and Mr. Richard Jones, Ty Llwyd.     The Reverend Garrett Roberts has been followed by eleven others, the present Minister being the Reverend Iwan G. P. Lewis, B.A., B.D.     It is sad to relate that in common with most Chapels and Churches there are empty seats today. Who knows that the spirit of 1904 which once filled the Chapel to its capacity during the opening ceremony, may yet be just around the corner.  

Rhosneigr Catholic Church

Rhosneigr Catholic Church

St Therese RC Church Maelog Road [Ffordd Maelog] Rhosneigr Isle of Anglesey  LL64 5QE  Mass Times   Sunday 9am    Thursday 10am

St Maelog Church

Site Description The church of St Maelog is prominently sited in the centre of the village of Llanfaelog, in a rectangular churchyard used as a cemetery set back from the junction between the A4080 and the road to Bryn Du. It is a nineteenth-century church built to replace the old church of St. Maelog, located on different site within the churchyard. It was built in 1848 in Decorated style to designs of Henry Kennedy of Bangor. It is constructed of rubble masonry with gritstone dressings, slate roofs with stone copings, crosses on the east chancel and porch gable apexes; the east gable of the nave carries the remains of a cross-socket. The church consists of four-bay nave with bellcote on the west gable, gabled south porch, shorter and narrower chancel with gabled north vestry (with an ashlar chimney at the north gable apex) and lean-to extension. Roofs are steeply pitched. The walls are articulated by a plinth and continuous sill band; each nave bay is articulated by a stepped buttress with a further buttress to the centre of the south wall of the chancel and tall buttresses flanking the window in the west gable.

Inside, the nave roof is of nine bays, with exposed rafters and collared trusses with chamfered soffits; braces are carried down to wall posts on plain corbels. The chancel, entered through a chamfered arch, is raised two steps and covered with geometric tiles; the sanctuary is raised by a further three steps, both within the length of the three-bay chancel roof. Some re-ordering was carried out in 2000 by Adam & Frances Voelcker. The west end of the church was separated as a lobby with meeting room above, a glazed upper screen - finely etched by Bill Swann of Porthmadog - maintaining the scale of the church. The upper room is lit through dormer windows.

Fittings and furnishings include a twelfth-century gritstone font (from St Mary Talyllyn) with raised Maltese cross on one face, chevrons on another; sanctuary furniture of moulded oak; and an oak pulpit raised by five curving steps, the top octagonal with deeply recessed facing panels. Stained glass includes some late nineteenth and early twentieth works, including a Pre-raphaelite style window of St. Cecilia, to John Price Roberts, Plas Maelog, d.1857.